Glen Kaufman

36gk Tiger Stripe/Tile Pattern Folding Screen (Can also be hung flat against wall), silk damask, silver leaf, 7 panels, 59 " x 78.75" , $12,000

Glen Kaufman



Glen Kaufman

35gk Gleaming Temples (from photos of Bangkok), Glen Kaufman, 4 panels, silver leaf on silk, 37" x 72", $12,000



glen kaufman

12gk , Yoshikawa, Noto, Glen Kaufman, silk damask, silver leaf; screenprint, impressed metal leaf, 48” x 24” x 1” 1990, $4,800

13gk Pulguk-sa, Kyong-Ju, Glen Kaufman, silk damask, silver leaf; screenprint, impressed metal leaf, 48” x 24” x 1” 1990, $4,800

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glen kaufman

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32gk SHIMOGAMO SCROLLS: STUDIO VIEW II, Glen Kaufman
photo collage, screen print and impressed silver leaf on handwoven kasuri silk
, 70” x 17”, 2002, $2,500



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33gk Golden Fruit/Stripes, Glen Kaufman, 14.25” x 11.25” x 2”, 2003, $1,400
34gk Golden Fruit/Log Cabin, Glen Kaufman, 14.25” x 11.25” x 2”, 2003, $1,400

Selected permanent collections:
Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois; Renwick Gallery of the National Museum of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan; Ba Tang Gol Art Center; Seoul, Korea; Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio; M.H. de Young Memorial Museum, San Francisco, California 



glen kaufman


8gk Manhattan/New Jersey View
Glen Kaufman, handwoven silk twill, silver leaf; screenprint, impressed metal leaf, 10” x 30” x 1”, $2,400

Statement:
I have set about creating my work in a foreign place – Kyoto – for half of each year since 1983. The images in my work can be seen as shadows cast on shoji screens or glimpses of a world seen through a personal window.

In these “window views” I have struggled to achieve a synthesis of my two worlds – tile roofs in Asia; skylines of cities and towns in America. Images of architecture in gold or silver leaf float behind grids on silk panels both large and small. The grid fragments the image and at the same time provides a familiar framework, allowing the viewer to perceive the entire image, yet concentrate on the small square.

The work evolves from my photographs, photographs that are transformed into strong black-and-white images that express the reality of the subject. These strongly contrasting images are printed onto a silk fabric by screening a special paste over a grid. Subsequently, gold or silver leaf is impressed into the cloth. When the excess leaf is removed, the grid is revealed and the image floats on a surface behind the window grid.

The metal leaf I use has inherent reflective qualities that vary depending on the type, color, thickness, and weave of the ground cloth. The reflection of light on the leaf and silk – which changes depending on the light source and the time of day – give an inner life and dynamic visual energy to these works.


Glen Kaufman